Nicole Woitowich

This year, the Summer Olympics are scheduled to be held in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, throughout the month of August. However, several athletes, coaches, staff, and journalists have decided to stay home this year, citing concerns for Zika virus infection. Brazil is currently experiencing a Zika virus outbreak with over 148,00 suspected cases of Zika virus disease as of May 2016 [1]. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the Zika virus disease is spread through the bite of an infected mosquito and can cause symptoms such as fever, rash, and joint pain. While in a healthy individual, Zika virus disease may only cause a mild illness, less is known about its effects in the elderly, immunocompromised, and those with underlying health problems. Perhaps most concerning is the risk of associated birth defects, such as microcephaly, which can occur if a pregnant woman is infected with Zika virus. Furthermore, it has recently been shown that Zika virus can be transmitted through sexual contact. This has left many individuals scheduled to travel to Brazil concerned for the health of themselves and their families.

Savannah Guthrie, a TV journalist who is currently pregnant, has reported that she will not be attending the Olympics due to concerns for the Zika virus [3]. Additionally, professional golfer Rory McIlroy has stated the same [4]. Those who do plan on traveling to the Olympic games, such as U.S. men’s volleyball coach John Speraw, are taking numerous precautions to avoid Zika virus. Speraw plans wearing long sleeves, staying indoors, and as an extra measure of precaution, he will freeze his sperm prior to the Olympics in the event that he contracts the virus while in Brazil [5].

The CDC recommends that all individuals traveling to Brazil practice enhanced precautions which include:

  • Covering all exposed skin with long sleeved shirts and pants
  • Applying insect repellent containing DEET
  • Pre-treating clothes with the repellant permethrin
  • Staying indoors in air-conditioning

To date, no mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus has been reported in the United States. However, as of June 22nd, there are 820 confirmed cases of individuals living in the U.S. who have contracted the virus while travelling abroad. If you plan on travelling abroad or to other U.S. territories this summer, check with the CDC for travel health notices and updates for local precautions.

Sources:

  1. Pan American Health Organization Epidemiological Update
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  3. New York Times
  4. ESPN
  5. New York Times

Image: CDC, James Gathany 

 

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